September 8th, 2014

4 Reasons Why You Should Start Recording Yourself Today

Written by Eric

There are perks to being a musician.

You get to step out into the spotlight and be the star of the show. You get to experience the exhilaration of creating music in the moment with other musicians. And you get to share your music with family, friends, and complete strangers.

But there’s one thing you don’t experience while you’re wielding your instrument: You don’t get to listen to yourself.

As a performer you’re too busy producing sound, keeping time, and listening to your fellow musicians to truly hear the sound that’s coming from your own instrument.

But what would it be like to be a listener at your own show? What if you could pull up a chair and really focus on each note of your solo as it happens – What would you sound like?

More importantly, would you be happy with what you’d hear?

Well there’s no need to guess, you can listen to your own concert, rehearsal, or practice session and it’s easier than you think. Here are 4 important reasons you should be recording yourself as a musician.

I) Wait…I sound like that?!

Let me ask you a question.

Have you ever heard a recording of your own voice?

I’m sure you have and if you’re anything like me you were probably caught off guard. The first time you hear your recorded voice coming from a speaker you can’t help but be surprised. How could that strange voice possibly be mine?

In seconds you realize an … Read More

August 7th, 2014

6 Practice Essentials for Every Improviser

Written by Eric

6 Improvisation Essentials

You walk into your practice room.

You sit back in your favorite chair and mentally prepare to play your first note of the day.

You glance at your stack of etude books, the half transcribed solo sitting on your music stand, and your growing list of tunes to learn and you let out a heavy sigh.

What are you going to practice today?

Sound familiar? Thought so.

Every musician knows this feeling well. Each time you pick up your instrument you’ve got to make a decision: Which type of practice is actually going to make you a better improviser?

Sure, we’ve all heard about the basic stuff, but in the back of our minds we’re secretly hoping to find that one perfect exercise or method that’s going to solve all of our improvisational woes.

However, it’s not that simple. The more you study and perform this music, the more you’ll realize that there isn’t a magic method for learning improvisation. The truth is each player has a personal way of approaching their time in the practice room that allows them to reach their goals.

So how do you sort through all of these methods to find the one that works for you?

Well the good news is that you don’t have to! You see, it isn’t one single method or practice plan that makes a player succeed, it’s the actual content of what’s happening in the practice room.

Take a closer look and you’ll see that every great practice routine … Read More

April 20th, 2014

Why Your Search for the Perfect Equipment is Not Making You a Better Musician

Written by Eric

You’re searching for the perfect sound.

You want to play long improvised lines with ease.

You want to have effortless high range, to play swinging phrases with a stellar tone, and to sound great on any jazz standard.

And to get there you just need that perfect instrument.

That vintage Martin Committee trumpet, that mint condition Mark VI, the perfect ride cymbal, that Slant Signature Otto Link, a Steinway Grand

Check it out!

It’s the same horn that John Coltrane, Joe Henderson, Mark Turner, and Seamus Blake play on:

Look no further…” the only thing between you and the sound of your dreams is $10,000!

As you can see, it’s way too easy to get caught up in the quest for the perfect equipment.

Believe me.

It’s fun to search for and buy new instruments and it’s all too easy to envision yourself squashing any musical obstacle with this brand new horn.

Before you know it, you’re spending more time on eBay and scouring the internet then you are practicing and listening to the music.

But wait a second, is this new instrument really going to change you as a musician?

We’re all obsessed with equipment

Visit an online music forum, attend a music conference, or strike up a conversation with your fellow musicians.

It’ll only be a matter of minutes until the topic turns to equipment.

What kind of horn do you play? Check out this new mouthpiece. Do you know what reeds Read More

April 13th, 2014

7 Surprising Qualities of the World’s Best Improvisers

Written by Eric

Wow.”

You’re sitting in the audience at a sold out concert and your favorite musician has just taken the stage.

Flawless technique, impeccable sound, and endless creative musical lines flow from the stage and fill up the concert hall.

Unbelievable,” you think. “This musician must be super-human!

They just might be, but have you ever wondered what this master musician is like in person?

What would it be like if you struck up a conversation after the show? What if you could see inside his/her practice room?

I’m sure your imagination could run wild with the possibilities, but be careful…

What you’re expecting isn’t always what you get. In fact, your perception of great players can often be completely wrong.

I’ve been pretty lucky to come in contact with some of the best musicians in the world and after each encounter, I always walk away surprised by what I find.

Here are seven qualities and habits of the best musicians that will catch you off guard.

1) It’s all about the fundamentals

It never ceases to surprise me.

I finally snag a lesson with a big name improviser and immediately envision an hour of life-changing insights, new harmonic possibilities, and secret licks that will transform my playing. However once I show up at the lesson, it’s all about the fundamentals.

Long tones, breathing, articulation, a single chord progression, time, scales, a standard tune…

Why? Well it’s no secret, the fundamentals of musicianship are … Read More

April 2nd, 2014

What, Why, Where, Who, When, and How to Transcribe

Written by Forrest

What, Why, Where, Who, When, and How to transcribe

Every day we receive countless variations of what, why, where, who, when, and how to transcribe questions in our inbox.

Should I transcribe lines or whole solos? Do I need to transcribe from the recording or can I just use a transcription book? Who should I transcribe? Do I have to transcribe Charlie Parker? Can I transcribe modern players? Is it okay to slow down the music I’m transcribing? What’s the process of transcribing? Did the great players of this music transcribe?

All of these and the others that come up are all great questions because they deal with something that is so necessary to learn how to play jazz and improvise the way you want: transcribing.

What should I transcribe?

What should I transcribe? Should I start somewhere in particular or just jump in head first? Should I do a whole solo or single lines?

Knowing what to transcribe can be difficult. There’s so much out there and you could literally do any of it. The best place to start is with the basic units and forms of jazz. So what does this mean? It means you start with something as simple as a major chord. Transcribe one line over a major chord and you’re on your way; acquiring useful language over these building blocks is essential.

The basic units and forms I’m talking about are: single chords (major, minor, dominant, half-diminished, etc.), ii Vs, minor ii Vs, blues, rhythm changes, and super common standards.

Does this mean you … Read More

March 29th, 2014

3 Easy-to-Fix Mistakes that are Making Your Solos Suffer

Written by Eric

“Uggh…ouch…”

Have you ever made these sounds when you’ve listened to a solo?

You know, one of those solos where you hear a couple of unsavory phrases and that’s it…no more! For the love of God, please make it stop!

If you listen to a good amount of music, I’ll bet you have.

But what exactly was it about this particular solo that turned you off so much?

The scales the soloist was using? The type of instrument they were playing?

No? Well it must be something…

You might be surprised, but a lot of what makes a solo sound bad doesn’t have anything to do with the notes or scales.

Harmonic tunnel vision

When you first start learning to improvise it’s all about the notes. All about the notes…

Major scales, minor scales, modes, arpeggios, chord tones, blues scales, bebop scales, the 3rd’s and 7th’s, dominant 7th chords, Major 9 chords, ii-V7-I, and on and on.

There’s so much theory to think about that you end up getting harmonic tunnel vision.

All you can see are chords and scales, scales and chords – every other aspect of the music becomes invisible.

You desperately want to play the right note at the right time so you clutch onto music theory like a stranded swimmer hanging onto a life preserver.

As a result, you forget about some very important parts of musical expression…

Remember, improvising isn’t just about which notes you play, it’s about how you play them.

And this is … Read More

March 19th, 2014

Why You Should Be Hearing Music in Your Mind

Written by Eric

I have a vivid memory of the first time I tried to play in an early jazz group. I was in school and was asked to play the trumpet part in an ensemble that met each week studying the music of Louis Armstrong, Jelly Roll Morton, and other significant early players.

Cool, building my jazz history foundation right? How hard could it be to go back and pick up these styles?

However, once that first rehearsal began I quickly discovered that there was a huge hole in my playing. I could make it through each melody decently, but every time it was my turn to solo I hit a wall. My mind suddenly became blank and I had nothing to play – no melodic ideas, no rhythmic inspiration, and no idea where to even begin crafting a solo.

The music was just not in my mind, plain and simple. The style was unfamiliar, I wasn’t hearing the rhythmic elements of the music, and my sound and articulation weren’t fitting in with the group’s sound.

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To be honest, I had never really seriously listened to anything before Bird, Dizzy Gillespie or the big bands of the 1930′s and ’40′s. Up to that point I was used to playing modern jazz standards, ii-V-I’s, and aiming for the upper structures of chords, but none of that worked over this style – in fact it sounded terrible.

Like many other musicians, I’ve encountered this exact feeling in other areas of my playing as well. … Read More

February 23rd, 2014

Creating the Perfect Practice Environment

Written by Eric

I’ve practiced my instrument huddled inside a closet, surrounded by dirty laundry. I’ve worked out scales after dark sitting in the back seat of my car. I’ve practiced classical etudes in secluded corners of Central Park. I’ve done my warm-up routine in hotel bathrooms and I’ve played into pillows after midnight to run through tunes.

Over the years I guess I’ve practiced in some pretty weird places. Now I didn’t exactly select these locations because I liked them or thought they would be a fun change of pace, it often came down to a simple choice: practice or don’t practice.

If you’re serious about music, you’ve probably encountered this exact situation in your daily quest to find practice time. You truly want to get some practicing done, yet despite your best efforts you’ve nowhere to do it.

You might be traveling, working late, staying at a friend’s house, or living in an apartment building where the neighbors have a strict quiet policy. Or you might just find yourself in a place where you don’t want to bother anyone.

As a musician you’ll encounter many obstacles on your journey to perfecting your craft, but there is a simple, yet important issue that can affect your playing in a big way: your practice environment.

While most people think about practice in terms of content (scales, etudes, technical exercises, tunes, etc.), it’s equally important to consider the quality of your practice time, specifically the physical location and the mental … Read More

February 9th, 2014

Reality Check: Motivating Yourself to Better Musicianship

Written by Eric

It’s been a few weeks since the new year when we posted articles on setting goals and making musical resolutions.

Did you make some resolutions this year? If so, how are they holding up?

Maybe you didn’t exactly make a conscious resolution, however you probably have some areas of your playing that you want to improve in the new year. Are you on track to achieve these goals or has your progress and ambition slowly come to a standstill?

Not to worry, if you haven’t stuck with those resolutions you’re definitely not alone. In fact you’re completely normal. Most resolutions and goals start out with excitement and determination, then slowly wither away after a few weeks.

Chances are you’re reading this article because you’re genuinely interested in improving your musical skill set, whether it’s ear training, improvising, music theory, or instrumental technique. That’s great, we want you to improve these skills and we want the information on this site to make a difference in your playing.

However, it’s going to take more than just reading an article to make this happen. The reality is that many people are going to read these articles and then…you guessed it, do nothing. I often did the same with the information I received from my lesson teachers, I would study my notes, make some goals in my mind, imagine getting better, and then never implement it into my daily routine.

With any type of large or life altering goals there seems to be … Read More

January 26th, 2014

Why You Shouldn’t Be a Real Book Player

Written by Eric

Take a peek into a high school jazz band rehearsal or grab a seat at a college jazz combo concert. Better yet, walk into your local jam session or take a close look at the jazz trio playing the next time you’re at a wedding. What do you see?

In each case you’ll find the “Real Book player.”

The Real Book player is the musician that learns tunes out of a fake book, practices in front of a fake book, and performs using a fake book. Like a ball and chain, the book is always there. No book = no music.

For years I used to be a real book player. I looked at lead sheets to memorize tunes, I practiced improvisation by staring for hours at written out chord progressions, and I relied on the book like a life preserver at gig after gig.

From my perspective, this all seemed to work out just fine, however after a few years a problem slowly began to emerge. I was performing standards from a book all the time, but I wasn’t actually learning any of these tunes that I was playing night after night.

Even worse, I wasn’t improving at all as an improviser. Week after week I was basically rehashing the same old material in the same exact way without having any musical progress to show for it.

The problem was not that I wasn’t trying to improve as an improviser, it’s that I was trying to use a fake … Read More